Articles written by Amber Armstrong-hillberry


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  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Jun 12, 2024

    June 12, 1924 About three months ago, the attention of the town council was called to the fact that transient peddlers and house-to-house canvassers, who pay no taxes nor contribute in any other tangible way to the growth and welfare of the town, are getting away with good Wrangell dollars that ought to remain in Wrangell. The mayor appointed a committee to draft an ordinance that would require itinerant peddlers to pay well for the privilege of calling on the citizens of Wrangell. The ordinance calls for a license fee of $300 a week or...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Jun 5, 2024

    June 5, 1924 Miss Yeteve Taake, field representative for the Pacific Division of the American Red Cross, arrived in Wrangell last Friday for a week’s work with the local chapter of the Red Cross. Miss Taake is very pleased with the work of the Wrangell chapter. She has spent the week looking over various reports, visiting with the recipients of the nurse’s services, talking with board members and many others interested and reached by this splendid service. “Loan closets are much appreciated in the communities having Red Cross chapters, and W...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|May 29, 2024

    May 29, 1924 For the first time in the history of the Wrangell schools, the entire high school graduating class was composed of all boys. Such an occurrence is thought to be without parallel. Six boys graduated from Wrangell High School Monday evening at the exercises held at Redmen’s Hall and received diplomas entitling them to enter the universities of the states. There were no girl members of the class. Neil Grant, as class salutatorian, cited incidents in the life of the class and told of some of the trials and pitfalls into which any h...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|May 22, 2024

    May 22, 1924 Among the passengers aboard the Queen, which was in port Saturday morning, was John Hooper, president of the American & Canadian Tourists Societies. Speaking to a representative of the Sentinel, he said: “This will be Alaska’s greatest year. Every boat is filled for July and August, with many loaded for June and September. Ketchikan and Petersburg cannot take care of any stopovers, so the bulk of this will go to Wrangell, Juneau and Skagway, who are best prepared for this season’s stopovers.” Mr. Hooper is recognized as the tou...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|May 15, 2024

    May 15, 1924 The opening of navigation on the Stikine River this week was marked by heavy shipments of mining equipment and supplies, and a passenger list which included a number of well-known mining men. The increasing interest shown in the Dease Lake region and other sections beyond Telegraph Creek in British Columbia is an unmistakable forecast of considerable mining activity in the Cassiar the coming season. The Hazel B No. 3 and Hazel B No. 4 -- the first two boats to go up the Stikine this season -– left here Monday afternoon with a c...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, WrangellSentinel|May 8, 2024

    May 8, 1924 It is with considerable pleasure that the Sentinel is able to report that the ice making department of the Wrangell Ice and Storage Co.’s new plant will soon be in operation, and Oliver D. Leet, the manager, says the fish freezing department will be complete within another week. This new plant, from a standpoint of efficiency and economy of operation, cannot be surpassed by any plant of equal capacity. The power is furnished by Fairbanks-Morse diesel engines of the latest type, and a 256-kilovolt generator furnishes the e...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|May 1, 2024

    May 1, 1924 A number of citizens met at the Wrangell Hotel last night to discuss the matter of securing a saltwater pump for Wrangell. It is a well known fact that the only thing that saved Ketchikan during the recent fire in that city was the constant streams of saltwater that were kept going by the pumps on the vessels lying in port. O. D. Leet, manager of the Wrangell Ice and Storage Co., is willing to permit the use of one of his engines to run a pump at any time. With the hose now on hand it would be possible to reach a fire as far down...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Apr 24, 2024

    April 24, 1924 Perhaps no keener disappointment has come to a large group of individuals for some time than what came to the Wrangell school and PTA delegations Monday evening when the steamer Alaska left for Juneau without them. Gay with joyous anticipation, 18 contestants for the inter-school meet had left their homes when the boat appeared from the south. An hour or so later they returned to their homes and the community still had a right to be proud of them, for in spite of their disappointment they were showing a brave front and in many...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Apr 17, 2024

    April 17, 1924 To meet the expense of sending contestants to the meet which will be held in Juneau next week instead of Ketchikan as first planned, the Wrangell PTA staged two benefits during the past week. The first was a food sale and tea held last Saturday afternoon in the Patenaude Building. All of the donated items found a ready sale and the event was well patronized. Cash donations were also received from many of the townspeople and the use of the building was given rent free so that the sum of $7.60 was realized. The second benefit was t...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Apr 10, 2024

    April 3, 1924 The regular monthly meeting of the PTA will be held in the high school building Thursday evening, April 10, at 8 o’clock. A number of interesting questions will come before the meeting for discussion. Dr. O. H. Whaley will give an address on oral hygiene for children. The address will be followed by a declamation contest for grade school pupils. The contestants will be judged on delivery, poise, voice and selection. The declamations will be interspersed by songs by grade school girls who have been taught by Miss Hinselan. April 8,...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Mar 27, 2024

    March 27, 1924 Nicholas Fliness, who has the contract for building the Wrangell breakwater for the government, arrived here on the Northwestern Monday night. Mr. Fliness brought 14 men with him who will comprise his crew at the start. A camp is being established near the head of the bay. The cottage which the city recently bought from James Shaffner has been rented by Mr. Fliness and will be used as a mess hall. The Viginia IV arrived from Seattle Thursday afternoon bringing powder and other material and equipment which will be used on the...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Mar 20, 2024

    March 20, 1924 A floating city with myriads of twinkling of lights! That is what a fleet of halibut vessels appear to be on a dark night to an observer on the deck of a ship as it approaches the halibut banks anywhere in Alaska waters from Frederick Sound as far north as Kodiak, says the Ketchikan Examiner. The halibut fishermen work tirelessly all night long gathering in the silvery hordes. There is little sleep for them during the long voyages sometimes of many weeks duration, unless overtaken by stormy weather. But the halibut boats return...

  • The way we were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Mar 13, 2024

    March 13, 1924 Work will begin about the first of the month on a third story for the Wrangell Hotel. E. G. W. Morris will have charge of the work. In addition to the work of adding a third story, there will be many improvements throughout the entire building. Hot and cold running water will be supplied in all rooms. Twelve or 15 baths will be distributed over the building. When the third story is completed the Wrangell Hotel will have 76 rooms. The Wrangell Hotel, when the addition is completed, will be ahead of the town, but there is little...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Mar 6, 2024

    March 6, 1924 The leap year edition of the Stikine Messenger, published on the 29th of February by the girls of the high school, was a splendid six-page paper and reflected much credit on the girls and their adviser, Miss Alice Carlson, teacher of English and history, and could be shown with pride by any school. When it is considered that the total enrollment of the high school is only 25, the achievement of the girls is even more remarkable. The high school boys will issue the March edition of the Messenger and they make no secret of the fact...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Feb 28, 2024

    Feb. 28, 1924 Wrangell’s champion basketball team returned Monday afternoon on the Alameda from their two-week trip throughout Western Washington; a trip that demonstrated that basketball in Alaska is on par with that of the states. Even during the heavy playing schedule that was forced on the boys in order that they might return to their studies sooner – with seven games in nine evenings – the boys held up under the strain. Such a schedule is seldom attempted even by colleges, and it is a credit to the condition of the players that such a sti...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Feb 21, 2024

    Feb. 21, 1924 The new telephone system that was installed the first of the month instead of being considered an innovation and a luxury was straightway accepted as a necessity to the majority of citizens here. New subscribers have been added so rapidly that another directory is being issued. However, Manager J. K. Nevell announces he cannot give the best service possible unless people ring off when they are through talking. The logical one to ring off is the person who called the number, but the benefit is the same if the one who was called...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Feb 14, 2024

    Feb. 14, 1924 Last Saturday, Dr. Anna Brown Kearsley reported a case of typhoid fever to the Wrangell Board of Health, the patient being James Nolan. The general impression prevailing in Wrangell last week was that W.D. Grant, Mrs. Stephen D. Grant and James Nolan were all suffering from the same malady, as they had all attended the late C.E. Weber during his fatal illness. Therefore, Dr. Kearsley’s diagnosis of the case of Mr. Nolan naturally carried significance that extended beyond the individual case reported. Under these circumstances, t...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Feb 7, 2024

    Feb. 7, 1924 Wrangell’s Town Team triumphed over their rivals, the American Legion, in a fast and rough game at the rink on Tuesday night, 25-12. The basketball game was played as a benefit for the high school team which was leaving the next day for Seattle. Nearly a hundred dollars was garnered from the game. Speed once more won out over brawn when the two teams met. The floor work of Scribner, the 230-pound fairy, Totts Lewis and Mickey Prescott was too much for the big men on the Legion team. The first half of the game was close and e...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Jan 31, 2024

    Jan. 31, 1924 Arrangements have been made whereby the Wilson & Sylvester Mill Co. sawmill is to become a lumber manufacturing plant on a large scale. The present mill will resume operations next week, and at the same time work will begin on the installation of new and modern machinery in addition to that already in operation. Within a year the Wrangell mill will have a capacity of 100,000 board feet daily. New people have become financially interested in the mill, and as an indication that big things are not only planned but will be carried...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Jan 24, 2024

    Jan. 24, 1924 A new device that is a wonderful improvement in the power trolling gurdy and which will be a boon to fishermen has been invented by Steven A. Shepherd of Wrangell. With the aid of this new line-hauling device, the fishing lines are readily drawn up by power so that it requires no effort on the part of the fisherman to haul in his lines. One of these machines is in actual operation on Mr. Shepard’s gas boat, and the numerous fishermen who have seen it in operation are very enthusiastic over the machine and pronounce it a w...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Jan 17, 2024

    Jan. 17, 1924 The Women’s Council held their regular meeting last Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock and continued their work for planning a program for the year. In connection with the plans for the coming tourist season, a committee for totems and their preservation was appointed as follows: Mrs. Prichett, Mrs. Palmer, Mrs. Case, Mrs. Wheeler and Mrs. Waters. Totem committees have been appointed from time to time from various organizations, and little has been accomplished, but in view of the fact that many of the totems must be cared for soo...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Jan 10, 2024

    Jan. 10, 1924 The library report given at the Civic Club meeting last Saturday showed the biggest cash receipts since the library was started, at $15.10. Patrons of the library borrowed 140 books during December and 46 magazines. About 30 books of fiction have been purchased recently from a private library. While these are not new books, they are some of the bestsellers of recent years and will be appreciated by many who have not already read them. Jan. 7, 1949 The barnstorming Priest River, Idaho, high school alumni basketball team played two...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Jan 3, 2024

    Jan. 3, 1924 The liveliest event of the holidays for Wrangell was the big doubleheader basketball game between local teams and visiting teams from Kake. The first game was played between the All Stars of Wrangell and the Kake school team, and resulted in a score of 18-9 in favor of the visiting team. It was a good clean game and while the all stars put up a plucky fight, there was too much discrepancy in the weight and age of the two teams for the local boys to have a chance at winning. The second game was between the Wrangell High School and...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Dec 20, 2023

    Dec. 20, 1923 O.D. Leet, who has been in correspondence with members of the Wrangell Commercial Club for several months, arrived here a few days ago. He was present at the Commercial Club luncheon last Monday and laid his proposition before that organization. He announced that after investigating the local situation, he was convinced that there is a good opportunity here for a cold storage, and that he was willing to put in a plant if local people would go in with him on the proposition. He estimated that it would require $30,000 to put in a...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Dec 13, 2023

    Dec. 13, 1923 Red Campbell of the Mountain City Athletic Club has arranged with Mickey Prescot to train the latter, and believes that he will prove the best boxer in Alaska for his class. “The kid is game; he has brains and an almost perfect physical development. He is quick as a cat and at the same time well muscled. Once he is trained to put his whole weight behind his blows, it will require a first-class man to stand up against him. Take it from me, that kid is a wonder. All he needs is proper training and coaching.” Red said today. Dec...

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