(102) stories found containing 'national weather service'


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  • Southeast lives with risk of landslides - and more in the future

    Sean Maguire and Michelle Theriault Boots, Anchorage Daily News|Jan 3, 2024

    Over the past decade, landslides have cost Southeast Alaska communities in both death and destruction - 11 deaths and tens of millions of dollars in property and infrastructure damage. Now communities around Southeast are reckoning with a future in which more destructive landslides are likely, as climate change fuels the extreme rainfall events and storms that scientists say may lead to increasingly powerful events in the future. The most recent major landslide, on Nov. 20 at 11-Mile Zimovia...

  • Drones, laser imaging and weather stations will monitor slide site

    Caroleine James, Wrangell Sentinel|Dec 13, 2023

    From remote weather stations to laser imaging to autonomous drones, the state and borough are working together to deploy cutting-edge monitoring technology at the 11-Mile landslide site. LiDAR maps that were created before and after the slide will help geologists study potential landslide risks on the island. LiDAR, which stands for Light Detection and Ranging, is a laser-based imaging method that creates detailed, three-dimensional maps of the Earth’s surface. LiDAR instruments consist of a laser, a scanner and a specialized GPS receiver to e...

  • It was a stormy day throughout Southeast

    Sentinel staff|Nov 29, 2023

    The strong storm system that hit Wrangell on Nov. 20 struck across Southeast Alaska, dumping snow in the north, rain in the south and heavy winds throughout. A landslide closed parts of North Tongass Highway in Ketchikan on Nov. 20 and Alaska Power & Telephone reported that several slides and snapped poles took out power on Prince of Wales Island, including at Hydaburg, Thorne Bay, the Klawock-Hollis Highway and between Craig and Klawock. A road was also washed out in Coffman Cove. The Klawock School District opened up its gym for people stuck...

  • Forest Service to reconstruct Anan Bay cabin next summer

    Caroleine James, Wrangell Sentinel|Aug 9, 2023

    The Forest Service’s Anan Bay cabin, which was destroyed by a fallen tree in February, will be one of the first seven cabins built — or in this case, rebuilt — as part of the federally funded Alaska cabins project. Reconstruction on the cabin is scheduled for the summer of 2024. The updated Anan Bay cabin will be in the same location, but with an altered design. “We had an engineer go out and determine that the cabin does need to be rebuilt, but the foundation can be used,” explained Dawn Collinsworth, Alaska Region deputy director for recre...

  • Flooding takes out homes and damages others along Juneau's Mendenhall River

    Mark Sabbatini, Juneau Empire|Aug 9, 2023

    Amanda Arra saw about 50 feet of her Juneau backyard consumed by the Mendenhall River in just a few hours as the waters rose to a record flood level Saturday afternoon, Aug. 5. By evening, as a nearby home fell into the river, she feared she was going to lose hers as well. Her home was still intact at midday Sunday, but about a quarter of the structure was hanging over the eroded riverbank as friends carried her belongings outside the house. Arra had abandoned the home the night before and said...

  • Community in better water shape than last week

    Sage Smiley, KSTK|Aug 2, 2023

    It wasn’t a downpour but it was enough to raise the water level at both reservoirs and ease fears of shortages, Public Works Director Tom Wetor said of the rainfall Sunday and Monday. “Overall, I’m feeling pretty good,” he said Monday morning. With just a few weeks left of the heaviest water demand for salmon processing, and with the traditionally rainy weather of early fall approaching, Wetor thinks Wrangell will make it through the summer. “We’re in pretty good shape right now.” The borough last week urged residents to conserve water after a...

  • State sets commercial troll harvest limit at 74,800 kings

    Garland Kennedy, Sitka Sentinel|Jul 5, 2023

    The Department of Fish and Game has announced that 74,800 “treaty” king salmon (non-hatchery fish) will be available for taking in the summer commercial troll season’s first opening, which started Saturday. The department released summer king salmon harvest numbers on June 22. In total, 106,800 kings remain on the table following the spring fishery harvest, the agency said, and the troll fleet will be able to target 70% of those in the summer’s first opener. The fleet hooked 24,700 fish in the winter opener and an additional 14,100 kings i...

  • Holiday weekend charter boat accident near Sitka takes 5 lives

    Stefanie Dazio and Becky Bohrer, Associated Press|Jun 7, 2023

    A fishing adventure turned tragic for a family when disaster struck one of the two Sitka boats they chartered over the Memorial Day weekend, leaving three people dead and two missing despite a search over hundreds of square miles of ocean. The tragedy tore the Tyau family apart: Two sisters and one of their husbands are dead, while the other’s partner and the boat captain remain missing a week after the 30-foot aluminum boat was found partially submerged off an island near Sitka. Authorities on May 29 suspended their search after more than 2...

  • Drifting volcanic ash shut down air travel

    Sentinel staff|Apr 19, 2023

    Drifting ash from a volcanic eruption in the Russian Far East forced Alaska Airlines to cancel more than 100 flights last week, including its northbound and southbound jets through Wrangell and Petersburg last Thursday and Friday. Flights throughout Alaska had largely returned to normal by Saturday, other than a couple of missed flights to Sitka that day as a portion of the ash cloud hung around the community. Although a “very large area” of gas left over from the ash cloud still hovered over the eastern Gulf of Alaska near Sitka by Sat...

  • Record rainfall recorded at Juneau last year, but nothing special about Wrangell's wetness

    Caroleine James, Wrangell Sentinel|Jan 11, 2023

    Juneau saw record-breaking levels of rainfall in 2022, but National Weather Service measurements and the observations of local amateur meteorologist Bill Messmer suggest that Wrangell was spared the worst of the deluge. Juneau's 2022 precipitation totaled 88.31 inches according to measurements taken at the airport. This was three inches wetter than the previous record set in 1991. The National Weather Service hasn't recorded official stats for Wrangell precipitation in years, leaving the measuri...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Dec 7, 2022

    Dec. 7, 1922 A local business change took place Tuesday when F.E. Gingrass retired from the Wrangell Machine Shop, having sold his interest to W.R. Nevill. Mr. Gingrass had been with the business for the past 11 years. In April, 1920, Bert Harvie, of Petersburg, became a partner in the business and since that time the business has been conducted under the name Gingrass & Harvie. The style of the new firm will be Harvie & Nevill. Mr. Nevill came north last February to visit his father and brother, and liked the country so well that he decided...

  • Federal report recommends new safety regulations for Ketchikan flightseeing tours

    Zaz Hollander, Anchorage Daily News|Dec 7, 2022

    The National Transportation Safety Board is calling for new federal regulations to safeguard Ketchikan flightseeing tours following years of deadly crashes, several of them involving cruise ship passengers and bad weather. Seven flightseeing crashes in and around Ketchikan since 2007 have killed 31 people and seriously injured 13 others despite a longstanding voluntary safety program signed by flight companies, according to a 20-page report the NTSB released Nov. 29. The agency wants the Federal Aviation Administration to replace the voluntary...

  • Annual Audubon Christmas bird count scheduled for mid-December

    Caroleine James, Wrangell Sentinel|Nov 23, 2022

    Though you might not find four calling birds, three french hens, two turtle doves and a partridge in a pear tree in the rainforest ecosystems of the Tongass, there can be no doubt that counting birds is a quintessential Christmas activity. On Dec. 17, Wrangell’s avian enthusiasts will participate in Audubon’s 123rd annual Christmas Bird Count. Over 20 countries and thousands of volunteers contribute to this early-winter bird census, which runs from Dec. 14 to Jan. 5 yearly. Each community’s bird count is conducted on a single calendar day w...

  • Modeling saw the storm but not the surges that devastated coastal Alaska

    Yereth Rosen, Alaska Beacon|Oct 5, 2022

    When the remnants of Typhoon Merbok were barreling toward western Alaska to unleash what turned out to be the region’s strongest storm in more than half a century, meteorologists knew what was coming. What they could not predict was the exact level and location of flooding – devastation that prompted a federal disaster declaration by President Joe Biden and a whirlwind Alaska tour by Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Deanne Criswell. “The large-scale weather models nailed this storm, days in advance. The storm surge model...

  • Typhoon leaves behind extensive flooding in Western Alaska

    Anchorage Daily News|Sep 21, 2022

    The remnants of a massive Pacific typhoon that battered a thousand-mile stretch of Western Alaska dissipated Sunday morning, with floodwaters dropping and communities assessing damage from one of the worst storms on record. The storm left a trail of wreckage across coastal Alaska, with flooding, telecommunications outages and damage to buildings and infrastructure including roads, docks, seawalls and village runways. As of Monday morning, there were no reports of deaths, serious injuries or people missing, said National Weather Service...

  • Forest Service should allow logging of bug-infested trees

    Frank Murkowski|Aug 24, 2022

    It is ironic and absurd to the point of tears. We are told by the 2016 Tongass National Forest Plan, the Biden administration through Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and, of course, by local and national environmental groups that there can be no timber harvest on 9.4 million acres of inventoried roadless areas in the Tongass. Why? To “protect” fish and wildlife, and to save tourists from seeing clearcuts. As it turns out, we need to petition the Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Forest Service to act decisively to pro...

  • Online landslide-warning system starts up in Sitka

    Ariadne Will, Sitka Sentinel|Aug 17, 2022

    After several years of research, Sitka’s new online landslide-warning system is now live. But the site — which uses data from the National Weather Service alongside historical data to determine the level of landslide risk in Sitka — is only a start to the landslide research that remains to be done, said a scientist on the project. “It’s a conclusion but it’s also kind of a beginning,” said Jacyn Schmidt, geoscience coordinator at the Sitka Sound Science Center. Educating Sitkans on how to react to the possibility of landslides, and building...

  • Search suspended for ship passenger who fell overboard

    The Associated Press|May 25, 2022

    JUNEAU (AP) — The U.S. Coast Guard has suspended the search for a 40-year-old Texas woman who fell overboard off a cruise ship in Lynn Canal, north of Juneau. The Coast Guard ended the effort May 17 after searching for Selena Pau Pres, of Houston, for about nine hours, Coast Guard Petty Officer Ali Blackburn said. The search was conducted by boat and a helicopter in the waters near Eldred Rock in Lynn Canal, about 20 miles south of Haines. The captain of the cruise ship Celebrity Solstice reported the missing woman at 3 a.m. May 17, the Coast G...

  • Interior secretary will make first trip to Alaska

    The Associated Press|Apr 13, 2022

    JUNEAU (AP) — Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, the first Native American to serve as a cabinet secretary, plans to visit Alaska this month, with a planned visit to the community at the center of a long-running dispute over a proposed land exchange aimed at building a road through a national wildlife refuge. Haaland had planned to visit King Cove last year, but the trip never happened. The Interior Department on April 4 said Haaland planned to visit several communities and sites in Alaska the week of April 17, including Anchorage, Fairbanks a...

  • National Geographic outdoors show features Sitka father and son

    Garland Kennedy, Sitka Sentinel|Mar 23, 2022

    For years, Robert Miller and his son RJ have hunted, fished and enjoyed the outdoors around Sitka together. And now they have a wide audience through National Geographic's "Life Below Zero: Next Generation" television show. The show follows the Millers' outdoor adventures from hunting deer in the high country to fishing for halibut in the waters around Sitka. The elder Miller hopes he provides TV viewers a realistic and positive view of his lifestyle. "It's a way of life, and it's deeper than th...

  • Federal grant funds development of warning systems in Southeast

    Shannon Haugland, Sitka Sentinel|Feb 23, 2022

    The Sitka Sound Science Center and several regional and national partners have received a five-year, $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation to develop natural hazard monitoring and warning systems in tribal communities throughout Southeast. Project KUTÍ — the Tlingit word for weather — builds on the center’s community process used in Sitka to build a landslide warning system. Sitka will serve as a hub for the project, but the goal is to “develop a co-produced regional system for warning residents of events that might lead to...

  • Warmer, wetter weather creates its own set of problems

    Marc Lutz|Jan 13, 2022

    With this week's warmer weather, the snow shovels may get set aside but the higher temperatures and rain can create their own set of winter problems. Last week's single-digit temperatures gave way to 30-plus degrees by Sunday and 44 by Monday afternoon. Heavy snow on Saturday totaled nine inches before transitioning into rain on Sunday. Such rapid changes in weather can be detrimental to anything carrying the weight of wet snow and efforts to drain off the mess. "The impacts of what could...

  • It's been a wintery start to the new year statewide

    The Wrangell Sentinel and The Associated Press|Jan 6, 2022

    High winds, deep snow, below-zero temperatures, frozen pipes, canceled flights and ice-covered everything - it was not a merry Christmas or a happy new year for many Alaskans. Ketchikan endured its coldest-ever Christmas, and the next day, too, shivering to a low of zero degrees on both days, breaking a 57-year-old record for Christmas Day. It was cold enough to freeze saltwater in shoreline areas of Bar Harbor, City Float, Mud Bight and Ward Cove. The 350 residents of Hydaburg, on the...

  • Seabirds suffer as global warming changes their world

    The Associated Press|Dec 9, 2021

    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) - The warming of the planet is taking a deadly toll on seabirds that are suffering population declines from starvation, inability to reproduce, heat waves and extreme weather. Climate-related losses have hit albatrosses off the Hawaiian islands, northern gannets near the British Isles and puffins off the Maine coast. Some birds are less able to build nests and raise young as sea levels rise, while others are unable to find fish to eat as the ocean heats up, researchers have...

  • Unexpected wind gusts knock out power in town

    Sarah Aslam|Dec 2, 2021

    An unexpected, strong weather system sent high winds tearing through Wrangell, snapping three Southeast Alaska Power Agency poles which blocked the highway at City Park and knocked out power to most of Wrangell for much of Tuesday afternoon into the evening. A peak wind gust of 54 mph out of the southwest was detected on Zarembo Island at 1:55 p.m., said Wes Adkins, a lead meteorologist at the National Weather Service Juneau Forecast Office. The U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management operate a remote, automated weather system on...

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