Articles from the October 19, 2022 edition


Sorted by date  Results 1 - 25 of 39

  • Fecal bacteria count at Shoemaker exceeds state standard for commercial shellfish

    Caroleine James, Wrangell Sentinel|Oct 19, 2022

    Recreational clam harvesters should take extra caution while preparing and cooking shellfish collected from Shoemaker Bay due to high fecal bacteria levels in those waters, according to Carol Brady of the state Department of Environmental Conservation. Brian Herman, co-owner of Canoe Lagoon Oysters, began testing the water in the Shoemaker Bay area for fecal bacteria — called fecal coliforms — because he hopes to establish an underwater storage facility to hold oysters that are awaiting meat test results. The Canoe Lagoon oyster farm is located...

  • Tillie Paul Tamaree's historic act of civil disobedience remembered 100 years later

    Caroleine James, Wrangell Sentinel|Oct 19, 2022

    A century ago on Nov. 7, 1922, Tlingit translator and civil rights advocate Tillie Paul Tamaree helped Charlie Jones, the seventh Chief Shakes, vote in a Wrangell municipal election. Her actions led to a court case that would secure the right to vote for Alaska Natives two years before the federal Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 extended citizenship to Native people across the United States. When she was 12 years old, Tamaree entered the Amanda McFarland Home for Girls in Wrangell to avoid an...

  • It's no trick, the Jabusch home is a Halloween treat again this year

    Caroleine James, Wrangell Sentinel|Oct 19, 2022

    Calling all candy lovers - a year after a blaze destroyed the Jabusch garage, the family's renowned Halloween decorations are back from the dead, with enough inflatable monsters and spooky skeletons to terrorize an entire army of trick-or-treaters. Kay and Jeff Jabusch aren't certain what caused last year's fire, though they suspect an old light bulb may have overheated and ignited nearby drapery. Instead of their usual festive fare - lights, grinning skulls and ominous signage directing trick-o...

  • State House candidates make their pitch to voters

    Sam Stockbridge, Ketchikan Daily News|Oct 19, 2022

    Alaska House District 1 candidates Dan Ortiz and Jeremy Bynum took turns at a Ketchikan community forum on Oct. 13 promoting why they deserve to win the Nov. 8 election for the district that represents Ketchikan, Wrangell, Prince of Wales Island and Metlakatla. About 50 people attended the forum, which was moderated by Ketchikan Gateway Borough Attorney Glenn Brown. Ortiz, the incumbent, drew nearly all of his answers and arguments back to his experience and accomplishments; his experience...

  • The Way We Were

    Amber Armstrong-Hillberry, Wrangell Sentinel|Oct 19, 2022

    Oct. 19, 1922 The regular monthly meeting of the Parent-Teachers Association was held last Thursday evening at the schoolhouse. H. W. Gartley spoke forcibly and to the point regarding the need for a playground for children, aside from the playshed on the school grounds. Mr. Gartley’s talk met with enthusiastic approval, and he was asked to act as chairman of a playground committee to look into the matter and report at the next meeting on available sites for a public playground where the boys can play baseball with no fear of breaking windows, w...

  • Mt. Dewey trail extension enters next design phase

    Caroleine James, Wrangell Sentinel|Oct 19, 2022

    Outdoor enthusiasts can look forward to a new and improved trail system next summer, with increased accessibility, slip-resistant tread and locally sourced materials on the upcoming Mt. Dewey trail extension. Last Thursday, borough Capital Facilities Director Amber Al-Haddad held a public walk-through of the new trail route, followed by a design review with landscape architect Chris Mertl and engineer Brandon Ivanowicz, contractors on the design work. The three-quarter-mile extension will wrap around the back of Mt. Dewey before connecting to...

  • School district will spend up to $385,900 for building condition surveys

    Marc Lutz, Wrangell Sentinel|Oct 19, 2022

    With voter approval of a $3.5 million bond issue, the Wrangell School District wasted no time in moving ahead with its plan to go after a state grant as it works to fully fund needed repairs at its buildings. But before the district starts any work, it first must determine exactly what needs fixing so it can set priorities and assemble cost estimates. To that end, the school board voted Oct. 11 to appropriate up to $385,900 from the district’s major maintenance fund to pay for condition surveys of all three buildings. The fund has a current b...

  • School enrollment moves up slightly to 266 students

    Larry Persily, Wrangell Sentinel|Oct 19, 2022

    School enrollment is heading in the right direction, but just slightly. After counting 257 students during the state-mandated annual tally last year, this year’s Wrangell enrollment count was at 266 as of last week, said Schools Superintendent Bill Burr. The school district had estimated 263 students when it put together its budget for the 2022-2023 school year. State funding, which provides more than 60% of the district’s operating budget, is based on enrollment, with districts statewide required to submit their count every October. The hig...

  • David Wilson will serve as school board president

    Sentinel staff|Oct 19, 2022

    David Wilson will serve as school board president for a second year. He was selected by board members at their Oct. 10 meeting. Wilson has served on the board since 2017. He ran unopposed for the board in the Oct. 4 municipal election. Members selected Brittani Robbins as vice president. She has served on the board since last year. Angela Allen was reappointed to a second term as the board secretary. Filling out the five-member school board are new members Elizabeth Roundtree and Esther Ashton. They replaced Jessica Whitaker and Julia...

  • Legislature and governor need to boost school funding

    Wrangell Sentinel|Oct 19, 2022

    The Wrangell School District could face a financial squeeze in the next several years, forcing hard decisions over which programs get cut, what classes go away and how much staff is left. It’s not that the administration or staff did anything wrong. Just as school districts statewide, Wrangell has been waiting on some legislators and governors to put aside their biases against teacher unions, their personal views on political issues and their tendency to hold schools responsible for every shortcoming in society, and move to approve an i...

  • Dividend politics not music to the ear

    Larry Persily Publisher|Oct 19, 2022

    Regardless whether you like harp music, it’s soothing, relaxing, even peaceful. Which leads me to apologize for continuing to harp on Alaska’s Permanent Fund dividend politics, which are anything but musical. They’re more akin to the wordless scream of a heavy-metal song, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing. But they sure get the audience fired up. Unless you believe in $100-plus oil prices or heavy taxes or large-scale budget cuts, the state treasury cannot afford endless years of $2,500 or $3,000 dividends, especially not the $4,00...

  • Former publisher had a passion for community journalism

    Marc Lutz, Wrangell Sentinel|Oct 19, 2022

    I stood on the deck of my aunt’s house in Edmonds, Washington, last week while on vacation, overlooking Puget Sound. Whidbey Island could be seen off to the right through the haze of wildfire smoke on an otherwise uncharacteristically sunny day. “My former boss lives on Whidbey,” I told my Aunt Marie. I explained to her how he used to split his time between his home on the island and one in Angels Camp, California. I said I should reach out to see how he was faring since I had heard he had been diagnosed with cancer. Ralph Alldredge was a tri...

  • Chamber of commerce should recognize businesses that close

    Oct 19, 2022

    As some of you may have already heard, Wrangell is losing yet another downtown storefront business. Twisted Root Market has announced its closure. Twisted Root was dedicated to providing Wrangell with fresh, organic produce. Its mission was to keep us healthy with a variety of nutritious food options, while also partnering with local farms, bakers — and they sold local eggs. It is truly a devastating loss for our community. Closing a business is an incredibly difficult process. I ask that the Wrangell Chamber of Commerce rally around Twisted R...

  • Democrats are hypocrites when it comes to election challenges

    Oct 19, 2022

    Referring to Larry Persily’s opinion piece, “Republican election deniers threaten democracy” (Oct. 12 Sentinel), I wonder if a double standard is part of the new “improved democracy.” It remains to be said that there were also many election deniers among Democrats in 2016 claiming Trump lost the election, calling him an illegitimate president for four years and challenging the electoral count. If the act of questioning election results threatens democracy, how come the very same people who challenged Trump’s 2016 win present themselves...

  • Wrong time to experiment with changing state constitution

    Oct 19, 2022

    I can think of a number of issues we Alaskans should address and then deal with that would make this wonderful place we call home a better place to live. A constitutional convention doesn’t make my “to do” list, and if you think about what we need in terms of civic discussion and action on pressing matters, it likely won’t make your list either. Right now, there is plenty of evidence which supports the idea that we live in a highly charged political climate. Partisan politics, political backstabbing and chaos are often the norm. What we don...

  • School assembly honors the champs

    Oct 19, 2022

    The state champs Wrangell High School cross country running team was honored last Friday at an assembly in the school gym. From left: Randy Churchill III, Ethan Blatchley, Ian Nelson, Daniel Harrison, Boomchain Loucks and Devlyn Campbell, and assistant coach Mason Villarma, shared in the moment. The team placed first at state in Anchorage the previous weekend, winning the championship for the first time in the school's history. Harrison came in first overall with a time of 17:29.1. (Photo by...

  • Swimmers finish with personal-best times in Sitka meet

    Sentinel staff|Oct 19, 2022

    The Wrangell High School swim team traveled to Sitka last Friday and Saturday to compete in the town’s invitational swim meet, turning in three personal bests, four season bests and eight top 10 finishes. Head coach Jamie Roberts said the team has been working on breathing patterns and other techniques, and “sometimes, it takes a while for their practice patterns to translate into race patterns, as muscle memory can be challenging to overcome.” Despite that, the individual swimmers did well in their categories. Wrangell didn’t have a men’s r...

  • Borough extends its lease with Trident Seafoods

    Caroleine James, Wrangell Sentinel|Oct 19, 2022

    The borough assembly unanimously approved a resolution to amend Trident Seafoods’ lease of the borough-owned cold storage facility. The new five-year lease establishes building maintenance guidelines and raises the rental rate from $1,370 to $2,990 per month, with 2% yearly increases to account for inflation. The changes are part of the borough’s ongoing effort to update its leases, explained Borough Manager Jeff Good. Though the company’s new agreement lasts longer than its previous one-year lease extensions, Trident is still deter...

  • Borough assembly approves contract for new school fire alarms

    Caroleine James, Wrangell Sentinel|Oct 19, 2022

    The borough assembly unanimously approved a $574,000 contract with Sitka Electric to install new fire alarm systems at the middle and high schools. The majority of the project will be funded through state Community Development Block Grants, though the borough may contribute up to $180,750 in local funds. Though the fire alarm system meets the code that was in place when it was installed in the 1980s, it needs to be updated to meet current standards, explained borough Capital Facilities Director Amber Al-Haddad. The system has become difficult...

  • Pumpkin Patch will pop up at downtown pavilion

    Sentinel staff|Oct 19, 2022

    The chamber of commerce’s annual Pumpkin Patch event will start at 11 a.m. Saturday at the downtown pavilion. In addition to orange, white, blue and pink pumpkins for people to pick up and take home, the event will include a bake sale, chili feed and face painting, said Luana Wellons, of the chamber. Lynch Street will be closed to traffic and the pumpkins set out in the street for kids to make their selections. They will be sold by weight. The Girls Scouts will run the bake sale and Saint Frances Animal Rescue will staff the chili feed, both a...

  • 'Sound of Music' will need a few extras and dancers

    Sentinel staff|Oct 19, 2022

    As of last week, “The Sound of Music” cast was short just one male actor and will need some extras, partygoers and dancers as it gets closer to the Dec. 2 and 3 stage performance. “It’s hard to find male actors in town,” Cyni Crary, one of the show organizers, said last Friday. She described the open part as “kind of like a bad guy,” though he doesn’t have many lines. The cast already includes almost 20 Wrangell volunteers, plus about a dozen singers, musicians and a choreographer. About five more volunteers are helping behind the scenes with s...

  • Candidates for governor differ on how to pay the Permanent Fund dividend

    James Brooks, Alaska Beacon|Oct 19, 2022

    Since 2016, no issue has divided Alaska state lawmakers more than the issue of the Permanent Fund dividend. The annual struggle over the amount given to state residents has repeatedly driven the Legislature into impasses that have brought the state to the brink of a government shutdown. Ahead of this year’s governor election, independent candidate Bill Walker, Democratic candidate Les Gara and Republicans Mike Dunleavy and Charlie Pierce have each outlined different approaches to solving the impasse, which voters have said is a top issue of c...

  • Dunleavy supports constitutional convention; Walker and Gara do not

    The Associated Press|Oct 19, 2022

    ANCHORAGE (AP) — Republican Gov. Mike Dunleavy has indicated that he will vote in favor of calling a convention to consider amending the state constitution. Candidates for governor at an Alaska Resource Development Council forum on Oct. 11 were asked during if they would be voting for a constitutional convention in next month's general election. Candidates responded by raising “yes” or “no” signs. Dunleavy and Republican Charlie Pierce raised “yes” signs. Former Gov. Bill Walker, an independent, and Les Gara, a Democrat, raised “no” signs. A...

  • Catch of invasive green crabs continues to grow; record 62 in one day

    Raegan Miller, KRBD Ketchikan|Oct 19, 2022

    Wildlife officials in Metlakatla continue to trap record-setting numbers of the invasive crab species that threaten local subsistence food sources and fish habitat. The tribe's Department of Fish and Wildlife has trapped hundreds of European green crabs - but the numbers keep growing. Months after the first green crab shell was found on the beach in Metlakatla, the community is still trying to figure out how to handle the arrival of a species that officials call one of the most invasive around....

  • Metlakatla working to prevent spread of invasive green crabs

    Yereth Rosen, Alaska Beacon|Oct 19, 2022

    Natalie Bennett was walking surveying a beach on Annette Island as part of a team trying to defend Southeast Alaska from marine invaders when she made a major but ominous discovery: the state’s first documented shell of an invasive European green crab. Bennett, a summer intern with the nonprofit Sealaska Heritage Institute who was working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, noticed the tell-tale spines on the side of the eye areas. Right away, she notified one of her internship advisers, Barb Lake of NOAA Fisheries. ...

Page Down

Rendered 06/17/2024 20:47